Seasons of the Year

The Seasons
The two months, December and January, contain three seasons of the church year.  At Christmas, of course, we celebrate the birth of Jesus.  The celebration of Christmas extends for 12 days, until Epiphany, January 6.  The primary decoration in the church at Christmas is a crèche, or manger scene, depicting the baby Jesus in the stable at his birth along with his parents, visitors and animals.  There is an old tradition that the Christmas tree and its decorations are taken down by the twelfth day of Christmas.

Advent is a time for preparation for Christmas.  It marks the start of the church year.

The third season is Epiphany, which begins on January 6 and continues to the Transfiguration, February 11.  Epiphany means “appearance,” or “display” and the day of Epiphany commemorates the visit of the three wise men to the baby Jesus.  (So, strictly speaking, we should not have the wise men in the crèche scene at Christmas.)  The wise men were non-Jewish holy men.  Their visit to Jesus is taken to show that the birth of Jesus was not just for the Jewish people, but for non-Jews (gentiles) as well.  (Rev Dr Peter Trudinger)

201712-iconSeasons of the Church Year
The two months, December and January, contain three seasons of the church year.  At Christmas, of course, we celebrate the birth of Jesus.  The celebration of Christmas extends for 12 days, until Epiphany, January 6.  The primary decoration in the church at Christmas is a crèche, or manger scene, depicting the baby Jesus in the stable at his birth along with his parents, visitors and animals.  There is an old tradition that the Christmas tree and its decorations are taken down by the twelfth day of Christmas. 

(The lion symbol of St. Mark from the Echternach Gospels, by Meister des Evangeliars von Echternach, c690. Image from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Evangelists)

Advent is a time for preparation for Christmas.  It marks the start of the church year.

The third season is Epiphany, which begins on January 6 and continues to the Transfiguration, February 11.  Epiphany means “appearance,” or “display” and the day of Epiphany commemorates the visit of the three wise men to the baby Jesus.  (So, strictly speaking, we should not have the wise men in the crèche scene at Christmas.)  The wise men were non-Jewish holy men.  Their visit to Jesus is taken to show that the birth of Jesus was not just for the Jewish people, but for non-Jews (gentiles) as well. (Rev Norah Norris)

© Scots Church Adelaide  Ph. 08 8223 1505