Scots Fellowship

Scots Fellowship meets on the first Thursday of each month in McGregor Hall at 12 noon. We are just a small group, but are ever hopeful that others will join us – men as well as women – you will be most welcome, and I am sure you would enjoy it. Bring your own lunch (we will make you a cup of tea or coffee) and enjoy with us a time of chatting and sharing news before our informal meeting starts. Our Minister, Peter, joins us for lunch as well as the staff from the office when it is convenient. 

The next meeting is Thursday, 3rd of November, and Rosalie Smith has agreed to come and share with us her experiences as the Director of a Kindergarten. Margaret Morey agreed to be Facilitator, and Mary Thomas offered to look after Kitchen Duties. 

Our October Meeting was a really great time of sharing – Rev Norah Norris was Facilitator and commenced with reading two extracts from the excellent book (written by Margaret Knauerhase) entitled "Seen and Unseen" – published in 2005 by Uniting Church Adult Fellowship Synod of South Australia. A report was given of Fellowships Day held on 6th October, and a reminder given of forthcoming events this month. 

We were all asked to share a memorable event - the result was most interesting. 

Margaret told us that in 1977 when her late husband, Clive, was on Long Service Leave from Sturt Patrol, they travelled to Western Australia by car and trailer, driving up the coast. Just out of Port Hedland the trailer broke down and they sought the assistance of Tony Chalmers the Frontier Services Patrol Minister at the time. They stayed with him – it was the 22nd June 1977 the day of Union – a momentous day. The trailer was repaired, and on they went to Darwin and then Alice Springs where the car and trailer were put on the train for home. 

Mary told of the family upheaval when her husband's work took the family to Port Augusta in the late 1950's – she didn't want to go, but eventually enjoyed life there when they settled. In 1963 the family went to Whyalla where she stayed until 1986 – enjoying immensely her time there. She said it was a life-changing event. 

Alleyne, in 1949, attended an International Botanical Conference in Auckland, New Zealand. She was part of the host group who were asked to arrange a bus trip for the visitors. It was fascinating to watch, but rather daunting when a volcano erupted, with huge boulders the size of a house coming down the mountainside! It was at this Conference she met Bryan, later to become her husband.

In 1970 Kath had her Long Service Leave due and went overseas on the “Oriana” – she was away for three months and has kept in touch with people she met. She has been overseas since but said there was something very special about her first trip – the magic of seeing new things and places for the first time. 

Norah was in Edinburgh, Scotland, on St Andrew's Day in 1977. She had been Assembly Clerk of the Presbyterian Church of South Australia for five years, helping to organise the planned union of the Congregational, Methodist and Presbyterian Churches. After the Inauguration of the UCA the three executive secretaries of the former denominations remained in their positions until the first SA Synod meeting in October. Those first months in the new church were disappointing as many people and congregations were not prepared to accept changes. Tired, disillusioned and uncertain about her future, she took Long Service Leave and went overseas and on St Andrew's Day visited John Knox House where the Reformer lived in Edinburgh. An entry in the page of Knox's journal that was on display that day inspired her to carry on. 

Marj told us of a frightening experience when she was on a trip to the River Murray and there was a really bad storm with thunder and lightning. We all enjoyed hearing about each other's memorable event in their life.

Mary Thomas

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